14 Benefits & Advantages of Lying (Safety, Avoid Conflicts,…)

Last Updated on February 14, 2024 by Lifevif Team and JC Franco

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Most of us are guilty of a white lie here and there, but many people use lying to get ahead in life. It might seem absurd to think of lying as something positive or good, but what if there are definite benefits and advantages of lying that you just haven’t thought of? This is certainly a topic worth delving into. 

Some of you may ask ‘how can lying be good, right?’ The truth of the matter is that we all lie. Studies have actually proven that most humans lie, albeit to different degrees. Some people tell whoppers while others tell a variety of little “white lies”. If you are prone to lying, do not worry; you are not alone. If you want to take a look at each of the 14 benefits of lying, read on. 

If you have lied recently (and you probably have), you have probably experienced one or more of these benefits. 

14 benefits and advantages of lying. Lying:

1. Can boost your mood. 

Are you ready for a mood boost? Just lie! Usually, people who are depressed are typically more honest and realistic with themselves than people who are happy. Happy people tend to be quite comfortable with self-delusion.

2. Might help you achieve your goals quicker.

Wouldn’t it be nice if you reached your goals without all the hurdles and challenges along the way? Sometimes telling the whole truth can delay your plans and thwart progress. If you have plans in place and want to reach your goals and reaching that goal relies on a certain bit of information, then telling a white lie to bridge the gap and reach that goal can be beneficial. 

3. Can make you more productive. 

You might not have ever thought of this, but lying in the workplace can actually get more done. Telling a white lie or two in the office can actually spur you on to being more productive. You could tell a boss that you are dead on time with a project when you are not. Chances are that once you tell that lie, you will work as hard as possible to get on schedule and make that lie a reality. 

4. Can make you a better friend.

We all want to be the best possible friend we can be, but what if that isn’t possible when you are being entirely honest? What if a few lies could ramp up your friendships levels? You do not really want to be the friend that hurts a friend’s feelings, do you? You might not want to tell your bestie that she looks really unattractive in a dress she is trying on. You may prefer to lie and say that she looks great, but would look better in another dress. Lying to a friend in the right type of situation can be really beneficial to you and him/her. 

5. Helps you avoid confrontations.

No one likes to be involved in any unwanted confrontations. What if you could avoid confrontations in the simplest possible way. Sometimes telling the truth can be seen as blunt or anti-social. Being honest might make others confrontational with you. You can use a bit of lying to quell confrontational situations. 

6. Could improve your friendships. 

Just how honest are you with your friends? Are they honest with you? It is a commonly known fact that most friends just are not honest with each other. Most people lie to their friends about their achievements and even make their lives look a whole lot better than what they really are. If you are consistently honest about what you are thinking and feeling, you might become a drag to be around.

7. Can help you be a better parent. 

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As a parent, you probably feel terrible when you lie to your child, but if you do tell a few lies, you might improve their experience in life. Imagine if all parents had to be completely honest with their kids every step of the way. There would be no Santa Clause, no Easter Bunny, or many other fun holidays. And of course, you would have some pretty unhappy little kids around the world. 

8. Can keep others safe. 

Who knew that lying and safety could go hand in hand?! No one wants to put anybody in danger. Say your home is broken into, and the criminal demands to know if there are other people in the house. You might want to lie and say that you are alone when, in reality, the kids are hiding in the closet. Okay, that’s a dramatic example, but the point remains. There are instances where lying can actually keep others safe or even save their lives. 

9. Might strengthen your relationship with your partner. 

Could you actually strengthen your relationship by telling a few lies? Yes, you can! Honesty may be the best policy in some relationships, but there is such a thing as being too honest. If you are unleashing secrets about your ex relationships and telling your partner truths that might make him/her uncomfortable and insecure, you might break your relationship down. Being a little less honest will help you to create a better relationship with your partner. 

10. Can help improve your negotiation skills.

When it comes to negotiating, lying actually plays an integral role in the process. When you lie, you know that others lie too. You know what to look for. Someone who lies will know that when a deal is put on the table, chances are that there’s some “wiggle room” in the negotiations. And this is because the person negotiating is telling certain lies to make the deal more beneficial to them. 

11. Might give you a self-esteem boost. 

Who knew that telling a lie could make you feel so good about yourself! Sometimes telling a lie can make us feel good about ourselves. If you think about telling your friends a story about something that happened, you probably dress the story with a few lies to make it more exciting or to sound more entertaining. It’s these lies that make people hang onto your every word, and it’s that outcome that gives you a self-esteem boost. 

12. Could reduce your risk of depression.

As already mentioned in an earlier point, the literature suggests that people with depression are usually more realistic and honest with themselves. It is also known that people who get over depression typically learn to be a little less honest about themselves and reality. If you want to reduce your risk of depression, be a little less honest. 

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13. Potentially secures good deals.

Did you know that a bit of lying could help you secure a better business deal? Imagine if every business deal was completely honest and that all parties involved had to share absolutely every thought and communication about a product or service. Business deals probably wouldn’t go ahead. When it comes to deals, sometimes there needs to be a certain amount of deception to make the deal move forward. 

14. Gets you out tricky situations.

Have you ever found yourself in a tricky situation with seemingly no way out? You might find that telling a lie helps to get you out of the tricky situation. For instance, you might not know how to approach a situation and be avoiding a friend’s calls. When they do see you, you might want to lie and say you didn’t know that they called, just to help ease the situation. There are many tricky situations that can be eased by telling a small lie or two. 

Last Word

Whether you are in the habit of lying once in a while or every single day, you probably already know that lying can be somewhat beneficial. If you want to benefit from lying and don’t want to hurt others, consider the abovementioned ways and scenarios where lying can be justified. As humans, we have the ability to lie effectively, but be careful not to become too comfortable with lying, or you might regret it. 

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This article was co-authored by our team of in-house and freelance writers, and reviewed by our editors, who share their experiences and knowledge about the "Seven F's of Life".

JC Franco
Editor | + posts

JC Franco is a New York-based editor for Lifevif. He mainly focuses on content about faith, spirituality, personal growth, finance, and sports. He graduated from Mercyhurst University with a Bachelor’s degree in Business, majoring in Marketing. He is a certified tennis instructor who teaches in the New York City Metropolitan area. In terms of finance, he has passed the Level I exam of the CFA program.